How We Got The Bible And Its History

In this video, we are going to discuss how we got the Bible and its history. This is a great topic for all Christians. We are going to talk about manuscripts, English Bible History which includes the roots of the King James Bible. Join us, it’s going to be a good time!

We only covered a small sample of the available Biblical manuscripts in the video, there are literally over 20,000 manuscripts in existence! Some of those being the Massoretic Text in the form of the Aleppo Codex, and Leningrad Codex. These books date back to the 9th century A.D.

Even more interesting, the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947 which date back to the B.C. era. The Dead Sea Scrolls are a remarkable match to the considerably newer Massoretic Text! This proves how much care was taken with the Massoretic Text, a text that forms the Old Testament in our Bibles today.

This is the first video in our series that includes; How To Study The Bible, and How To Use Bible Study Tools.

Biblical Manuscripts

In How We Got The Bible And Its History, we mentioned three different manuscripts and showed three different manuscript fragments. You will find those below, along with additional information so you can view these online.

Codex Sinaiticus

Codex Sinaiticus is a treasure beyond price. Produced in the middle of the 4th century, the Codex is one of the two earliest Christian Bibles. (The other is Codex Vaticanus in Rome.)

Codex Sinaiticus
Codex Sinaiticus

Classification: Majuscule
Date: 4th Century
Location: London, British Library
Shelf Number: Add. 43725
Language: Greek
Material: Parchment
Description: Codex Sinaiticus is a fourth century manuscript of the Greek Old Testament, the New Testament, the Epistle of Barnabas, and the Shepherd of Hermas on parchment; The facsimile images are from the J. T. and Zelma Luther Archives, A. Webb Roberts Library, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

– CSNTM: Codex Sinaiticus (additional images)

Codex Alexandrinus

Copied in the 5th century, Codex Alexandrinus is one of the three early Greek manuscripts that preserve both the Old and the New Testaments together.

Codex Alexandrinus
Codex Alexandrinus

Classification: Majuscule
Date: 5th Century
Location: London, British Library
Shelf Number: Royal 1 D.VIII
Language: Greek
Material: Parchment
Description: Codex Alexandrinus is a fifth century manuscript of the Greek Old Testament, the New Testament, and the Clementine Epistles on parchment. Images are from the 1879 and 1909 full-sized black and white facsimiles produced by the British Museum.

– CSNTM: Codex Alexandrinus (additional images)

Codex Vaticanus

The Codex Vaticanus is believed to be among the oldest copies of the Greek Bible in existence. It is called so because it is conserved in the Vatican Library. The Codex Vaticanus is a quarto volume which is written in uncial letters of the 4th century, on folios of fine parchment bound in quinterns.

Codex Vaticanus
Codex Vaticanus

Classification: Majuscule
Date: 4th Century
Location: Vatican Library
Shelf Number: Vat. gr. 1209, p. 1235-1518 (p. 1519-1536: 1957)
Language: Greek
Ink: Black; Red
Material: Parchment
Description: Codex Vaticanus is an important fourth century majuscule manuscript. It contains Matthew–2 Thessalonians, Hebrews 1.1–9.13, James–Jude. It lacks the Pastorals, Philemon, and Revelation. After Hebrews 9.13, the document is written in much later minuscule hand. 142 leaves on parchment, three columns, with 42 lines per column. The images are from the 1868 (pseudo-) facsimile.

– CSNTM: Codex Vaticanus (additional images)

Biblical Manuscript Fragments

Uncial 0308

Uncial 0308
Uncial 0308

Classification: Majuscule
Date: 4th Century
Location: Oxford, Ashmolean Museum
Shelf Number: P. Oxy. 4500
Content: Apocalypse/Revelation
Language: Greek
Material: Parchment
Description: Revelation majuscule manuscript on parchment; 1 fragment, single column, approximately 14 lines per column.

CSNTM: Uncial 0308

Papyrus P52

Papyrus P52
Papyrus P52

Classification: Papyrus
Date: 2nd Century
Location: Manchester, John Rylands University Library
Shelf Number: Gr. P. 457
Content: Gospels
MS Feature: Fragmentary
Image Description: Text
Language: Greek
Ink: Black
Material: Papyrus
Description: Second century manuscript of the Gospels on papyrus; 1 fragment, single column, approximately 18 lines per column.

CSNTM: Papyrus P52

Papyrus 87

Papyrus 87
Papyrus 87

Classification: Papyrus
Date: 3rd Century
Location: Köln, Institut für Altertumskunde
Shelf Number: Inv. Nr. 12
Content: Pauline
MS Feature: Fragmentary
Image Description: Text
Language: Greek
Material: Papyrus
Description: Third century manuscript of Paul on papyrus; 1 fragment, single column, approximately 32 lines per column.

CSNTM: Papyrus 87

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Agonzalez7
Member
Agonzalez7
3 months ago

A good friend of mine bought that for me. It’s a very good read! It’s question I’ve ask myself all the time. Especially when I was a new student of The Word. Very informative and easy to read. I haven’t finished yet. I recommend for anyone to order this book. Thanks for the video post, Brandon. God bless!

jackbolin
Member
jackbolin
3 months ago

Very informative. The American Standard is one I use on occasion, with of course the KJV being the main one since you can use it in conjunction with the Strong’s Concordance. I wish the Geneva Bible were available in larger print and in more modern English spelling. It actually predates the KJV and was heavily influenced by Calvin. A copy of the Geneva Bible actually came with the pilgrims on the Mayflower. Excellent study Brandon which hopefully will convince some naysayers as to the Word’s authenticity.

Jennifer Snead
Member
Jennifer Snead
3 months ago

Brandon, what do you think of the ESV Bible?

jlsterr05
Member
jlsterr05
3 months ago

Brandon, I love the video content you’re starting to do! Have you thought about doing full on bible studies via video or live Q&A’s? Also, what are your thoughts on the ESV? It’s a word for word translation and one that MANY churches under the Reformed theology have adopted. Our church uses it and I’ve done some comparisons with the KJV and they’re similar. Appreciate all your work and wisdom! Thanks,
Jared