World Events and the Bible

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Category: News (page 1135 of 1138)

Blowout in Gulf of Mexico: Wellhead releasing ‘unknown product’ into water off Louisiana coast (MAP)

Wellhead Release

East Bay, LA 2012-Nov-05

At 0640 on 5NOV12, USCG Sector New Orleans contacted NOAA SSC about a report of a wellhead releasing unknown product into the water. The location was described as “Northern East Bay” without precise coordinates. The release began early in the morning, exact time unknown and the rate of discharge is unknown. The release is unsecured and overflight is scheduled. There is limited information at this time and further investigation is required. USCG requested a trajectory to aid with field activities. […]

Cause of incident: Well Blowout

Latitude (approximate): 29° 5.00′ North
Longitude (approximate): 89° 15.00′ West

Energy News

La. sinkhole methane explosion possible says sheriff, refuting naysayers

The Assumption Parish sheriff stated that methane ignition and explosion are possible in the Bayou Corne sinkhole area, refuting naysayers about such an explosion and spotlighting grave human rights issues related to the “history-making event” and “environmental nightmare,’ according to a KLFY Channel 10 three-part special televised report aired Friday.

The possibility exists that Louisiana’s sinkhole-related methane, percolating in over a dozen sites near and miles away from the sinkhole area, could ignite and cause an explosion, according to Assumption Parish Sherriff Michael J. Waguespack, interviewed about the unprecedented Bayou Corne event unfolding in South Louisiana’s swampland.

Waguespack, lover of south Louisiana people and culture, made the statement to KLFY reporter Chuck Huebner about the massive amount of methane known to be trapped below the Assumption Parish sinkhole area surface, continually leaking and bubbling to the surface.

“If it finds a source, an oil well, a water well, it will basically come to the surface. If that’s inside of a shed, or something off the ground and it’s captured, it’s an ignition source,” stated Waguespack. – Examiner

After The Flood Comes The Freeze: “Tens Of Thousands Need Housing” Says Cuomo, As Nor’Easter Approaches

First the flood, now the freeze (and the lack of fuel and gas and heating just making it much worse). And for tens of thousands of residents of New York and New Jersey this means that as many as 40,000 will need to find alternative housing, especially ahead of Wednesday when a Nor’easter formation is expected to hit the Tristate area and bring even more freezing rain and cold to the region.

From Reuters: “Tens of thousands of people affected by superstorm Sandy could soon need housing as cold weather descends on the state of New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday. Cuomo, in a televised press conference nearly a week after the storm hit the U.S. East Coast, said the fuel shortages are improving but problems will persist for “a number of days.””

Elsewhere, and also from Reuters: “Victims of superstorm Sandy on the U.S. East Coast struggled against the cold early on Sunday amid fuel shortages and power outages even as officials fretted about getting voters displaced by the storm to polling stations for Tuesday’s presidential election. Overnight, near-freezing temperatures gripped the U.S. northeast. At least two more victims were found in New Jersey, one dead of hypothermia, as the overall death toll from one of worst storms in U.S. history climbed to at least 112. Fuel supplies continued to rumble toward disaster zones and electricity was slowly returning to darkened neighborhoods after a storm that hit the coast last Monday. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said it would be days before power is fully restored and fuel shortages end.” – ZeroHedge

London, Paris, Jerusalem line up for post-US vote action on Syria, Iran

The UK , France and Israel showed signs this week of lining up for military action with regard to Syria and Iran as soon as America’s presidential election was out of the way Tuesday, Nov. 6, debkafile’s military sources report. Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu spent two days (Oct. 31-Nov. 1) talking to President Francois Holland. As the Defense Minister Ehud Barak landed in London the next day, Prime Minister David Cameron was reported on standby for the dispatch of RAF fighter-bombers to the Persian Gulf.

Barak flew to London after US Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had spent several days in Israel, no doubt tying up the last ends of US-Israeli cooperation for potential action.

Although America’s top military chief can’t tell who will be his next commander-in-chief – Barack Obama for another four years or the Republican Mitt Romney – he is duty-bound to have US forces in the Middle East ready for any contingency.

Although none has admitted as much, all the parties to these consultations did their best this week to chart alternative scenarios applicable to either winner. The consensus was that whether it is Obama or Romney, the two flaming Middle East crises can no longer remain subject to the policy immobility dictated by the presidential campaign – certainly not the Syrian bloodbath. – Debka

Moscow Warns against Assad Ouster

The removal of President Bashar al-Assad from power will do nothing to end the 19-month civil war in Syria but will only escalate the violence, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Wednesday.

“It is like daydreaming to speculate on the subject, to the effect that if the [Syrian] government is overthrown everything will fall into place,” Lavrov said after a meeting with his French counterpart Laurent Fabius.

“If this is a priority for somebody, bloodshed will continue, and for quite a while, too.”

“Assad’s fate should be decided by the Syrian people,” he added.

There is no military solution to the Syrian conflict as mercenaries fighting on the side of the Syrian insurgents keep arriving in the country from neighboring states, the minister noted.

Lavrov said on Monday Moscow was disappointed by the failure of a United Nations-brokered ceasefire, but there was little sense in blaming either side.

Western powers have condemned both Russia and China for their repeated refusal to back UN sanctions against Assad’s regime, which the United Nations has accused of complicity in the massacre of unarmed civilians. Russia says the UN resolutions contain a pro-rebel bias and that both sides are to blame for the continued fighting, which Syrian rights groups say has claimed up to 35,000 lives.

Russian President Vladimir Putin vowed earlier this year not to allow a repeat of last year’s “Libya scenario,” which saw the ouster and murder of Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi after a NATO military campaign. – RIAN

World Events and the Bible: It would seem we are closing in on the fulfillment of this prophesey. The burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap. – Isaiah 17:1

East Coast Fuel Shortage to Last Weeks

Power outages at hundreds of gas stations and a distribution bottleneck due to flooding damage and power loss has caused a gasoline shortage in the New York metropolitan area that may not be cleared up for at least a week, according to industry experts.

What was a problem for drivers when Super Storm Sandy ended two days ago has become a nightmare for frazzled motorists who find themselves in gas lines that can stretch on for hours. Some lines were hundreds of cars long in sections of New Jersey and New York Thursday, and in a number of locations police monitored the lines which interfered with traffic flow in some areas.
The problem is not gasoline supplies, but the ability to distribute it, especially from the critical terminal area around Linden, N.J., which lost power and was hit by storm surge. An estimated 75 percent or more of the gas stations in New Jersey were closed either because they had no gasoline, no power or both, said Sal Risalvato, executive director of the N.J. Gasoline, Convenience, Automotive Association. His organization represents about 1,000 gasoline stations in N.J.

“What I’m seeing is there’s a combination of problems. Power is at the root of it. That means gasoline that is already in inventory, already refined in those big tanks you see along the side of the turnpike, they can‘t get that gasoline into the delivery trucks without power,” said Risalvato.

Those “white tanks” along the New Jersey turnpike are gasoline terminals, owned by a number of companies, and the question for the industry is how quickly can normal operations resume after power is restored. A number of New Jersey based companies, like NuStar [NU 39.24 -0.06 (-0.15%) ] and Shell’s Motiva, reported that the storm surge drove water into the terminal areas, and it is unclear when they will be operational. One NuStar Energy executive estimated the marine terminals at his site could take four to six weeks to repair. – CNBC

World Events and the Bible: This is one of many reasons you should always have some stock of food and any other resources you may need during time of trouble…

Staten Island Residents: ‘We Need Food, We Need Clothing’

The residents of Staten Island are pleading for help from elected officials, begging for gasoline, food and clothing three days after Sandy slammed the New York City borough.

“We’re going to die! We’re going to freeze! We got 90-year-old people!” Donna Solli told visiting officials. “You don’t understand. You gotta get your trucks down here on the corner now. It’s been three days!”

Staten Island was one of the hardest-hit communities in New York City. More than 80,000 residents are still without power. Many are homeless, and at least 19 people died on Staten Island because of the storm.

One of the devastated neighborhoods was overwhelmed by a violent surge of water. Residents described a super-sized wave as high as 20 feet, with water rushing into the streets like rapids. – ABC

Hurricane Sandy: Small Town USA

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 75 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 4.6 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here’s a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CONNECTICUT

Patience is tested again as residents weather another long stretch without power in a state where outages have become a political issue after repeated storms. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 378,000, down from a peak of more than 345,000.

DELAWARE

Governor lifts state of emergency and authorizes National Guard to continue cleanup support. Shelters close. Deaths: none. Power outages: 500, down from more than 45,000.

KENTUCKY

The last remnants of Sandy drop more snow in the mountains on top of a foot that already fell. Deaths: none. Power outages: 3,000.

MAINE

Amtrak’s Downeaster resumes service. Governor sends forest rangers to New York City to help with recovery there. Deaths: none. Power outages: 3,300, down from more than 90,000.

MARYLAND

Residents return to polls after storm forced cancellation of early voting for two days. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 47,345, down from 290,000.

MASSACH– USETTS

Storm shifted a dead whale that had been left to rot on the shoreline to a spot where scientists can now recover the bones before it is buried. Deaths: none. Power outages: 19,500, down from 400,000.

MICHIGAN

Cargo shipping on the Great Lakes resumes after high waves subside. Deaths: none. Power outages: 10,000, down from 154,000.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Surprise “microburst” from vestiges of storm topples pines onto lake cottages. Trick-or-treating postponed to Sunday. Deaths: 1. Power outages: 16,000, down from 210,000.

NEW JERSEY

Debate rages about whether to rebuild delicate but popular barrier islands a day after President Barack Obama tours them by air. National Guard delivers food and water to people in flooded Hoboken. Deaths: 14. Power outages: 1.76 million, down from 2.7 million.

NEW YORK

New York City subways partially reopen, but streets are still choked with traffic. LaGuardia Airport set to reopen; the city’s other two major airports already started limited flights. It could be days before power is fully restored. Deaths: 30, including 22 in New York City. Power outages: 1.6 million, down from 2.2 million.

NORTH CAROLINA

Sea search continues for the captain of a tall ship that sank. Deaths: 2. Power outages: mostly restored.

OHIO

Cleanup begins after another day of steady rains and gusty winds that led to flood warnings along Lake Erie. Deaths: 2. Power outages: 100,000, down from more than 250,000.

PENNSYLVANIA

Utility crews struggle to restore power in state where most damage was driven by wind, not water. Deaths: 12. Power outages: 525,000, down from 1.2 million.

RHODE ISLAND

Power outages and impassable roads mean some residents may not be able to return home for days in some coastal communities. Deaths: none. Power outages: 35,000, down from more than 122,000.

TENNESSEE

Elizabethton businesses close off a street and cover sidewalks for trick-or-treaters as snow falls in mountainous areas. Deaths: none. Power outages: minimal.

VERMONT

Amtrak works to restore service to the state after tracks were damaged in other areas. Deaths: none. Power outages: mostly restored, down from more than 10,000.

VIRGINIA

National Guard winds down most recovery operations. U.S. Navy sends three Virginia-based ships toward the Northeast in case they’re needed. Deaths: 2. Power outages: 9,300, down from more than 180,000.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Early voting resumes after being shut down for two days, and hours are extended. Federal workers return, National Mall reopens. Deaths: none. Power outages: mostly restored, down from 25,000.

WEST VIRGINIA

Last remnants of Sandy drop more snow; some areas have seen nearly 3 feet. Eight buildings collapse in Nicholas County; no injuries reported. Deaths: 6. Power outages: 154,000, down from about 271,000. – Photos @ HuffingtonPost

The Other Hurricane Sandy: The Storm’s Impact in Haiti

Hurricane Sandy was already a prolific killer by the time it ravaged the Jersey Shore, flooded New York’s subway system, and turned Queens’s scenic Breezy Point neighborhood into an ashen crater.

Before making landfall in the United States, Sandy swept through the central Caribbean, directly hitting Jamaica and Cuba, and dropping more than 20 inches of rain on a country already well acquainted with the blunt force of nature: Haiti. The storm killed 52 Haitians, flooded much of the country’s south, and displaced over 18,000 families. Up to 400,000 Haitians are still living in camps for those left homeless by the country’s devastating 2010 earthquake. A subsequent cholera outbreak — which most likely originated with U.N. peacekeepers stationed in the country — killed up to 7,500 people. And while Haiti’s 2011 presidential election might have demonstrated that the country’s democratic development wouldn’t be delayed on account of the earthquake, it was still a contentious affair that culminated in the elevation of Michele Martelly, a former pop singer with no prior political experience. There is never a “good” time for a killer storm to strike, but Sandy slammed into a highly vulnerable country that was struggling to emerge from a long spell of instability.

Major storms pose an especially daunting challenge for countries with a limited capacity for coping with them. Haiti certainly qualifies, although according to Eduardo Gamarra of Florida International University, the country is in a better position to cope with a devastating weather event than it was in the chaotic year or so after the earthquake struck. Crucially, Martelly’s government, which has received mixed reviews from Haitians, has pushed for people to move out of post-earthquake refugee camps.

“The objective of the government over the last 18 months has been to try to get people out of tents,” Gamarra said. “And in a sense, they’ve managed to avert a greater disaster by doing that. If the hurricane had struck when these people where still in those tents the damage would have been greater and a lot more people would have been exposed.”  – The Atlantic

FCC: Sandy downed 25 percent of cell towers

Hurricane Sandy has pulled down around 25 percent of the U.S.’ wireless companies’ cell sites in the 10 states affected by the storm, federal regulators said on Tuesday.

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) told reporters that most of the cell towers still operational are being powered by generators but could run out fuel before domestic electricity service is restored to the affected areas, reports the Associated Press news agency.

In spite of the downed trees and the massive power outages, the landline phone network has held up better in the affected 10 states hit by Sandy than the cell networks have. That said, more than a quarter of landline customers are affected by outages in Virginia, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and New York City and state.

However, the FCC did not give an estimate to how many users were affected by the cell outages.
911 call centers have held up well, according to the regulator, but some are affected by the power outages and are re-routing calls to other centers outside of callers’ nearby locations.

“The storm is not over. And our assumption is that communications outages could get worse before they get better, particularly for mobile networks because of the flooding and loss of power,” said FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said during a conference call late yesterday.

Out of the major U.S. cellular networks, AT&T, Sprint, Verizon and T-Mobile all said they would continue to “assess the damage” left by Sandy, but did not have a time frame of when services might be up and running again. – ZD Net

Eurozone Unemployment Hits New Record High

Unemployment in the eurozone has risen to a new high, with Spain recording the highest jobless rate with more than one in four out of work.

There are now 18.49 million people without jobs in the 17 countries sharing the euro, European statistics office Eurostat said on Wednesday, with an extra 146,000 joining the ranks of the unemployed last month. The jobless rate increased to 11.6% in September, the highest on record, from a revised 11.5% in August.

“With surveys suggesting that firms are becoming more reluctant to hire, the eurozone unemployment rate looks set to rise further, placing more pressure on struggling households,” said Ben May, European economist at Capital Economics.

The lowest unemployment rates were recorded in Austria (4.4%), Luxembourg (5.2%), Germany and the Netherlands (both 5.4%), which are near full employment. Spain (25.8%) and Greece (25.1% in July) had the highest unemployment in the eurozone, while France looks much like Italy (both at 10.8%), with a steady rise in joblessness. August data for Greece will be published next week, although the true picture is probably worse, as a growing number of Greek workers remain nominally employed but have not been paid for some time.

Howard Archer, chief European economist at IHS Global Insight, said the jobless data was “dismal”, adding: “Eurozone labour markets remain under serious pressure from ongoing weakened economic activity and low business confidence.”

Youth unemployment also hit a new high in Spain with 54.2% of under-25-year-olds out of work, up from 53.8%.

Across the whole European Union, 25.751 million men and women were without jobs last month – an increase of 169,000 from August – while the unemployment rate stayed at 10.6%. – Guardian

Looters ‘swipe’ up the mess in chaos zones

Hurricane Sandy brought out the worst yesterday in some sleazy New Yorkers, who looted stores and homes across the city.

Some posed as Con Ed workers to dupe their victims.

Police arrested more than a dozen looters in the Rockaways and Coney Island, which had been evacuated, and stood guard outside ravaged stores at the South Street Seaport.

“This morning when they told us the water receded, I walked back to the house to feed [my pets],” said Eric Martine, 33, a cabby who lives in Brooklyn’s Gerritsen Beach. “Guys were looting, pretending they were Con Ed and holding people up. It was sick.”

Residents said police warned them to beware of crooks pretending to be utility workers.
Cops fanned out yesterday to deal with looters around the city.

“We will not tolerate these scumbags looting. We will arrest them on sight,” said a police source.

The storm knocked out the plate-glass windows of several Seaport stores, and piggish punks took full advantage of the unguarded merchandise.

“I saw two people walking by the Ann Taylor store and reach in and take some shirts that were just laying right there by the mannequin,” said one man. “It’s really messed up, man. They’re really taking advantage.” – NY Post

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